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North Andover (978) 686-7623
Tewksbury (978) 640-1010

Tuesday, 22 November 2022 00:00

Life-changing moments can happen from slipping on a rug, or from tripping over an object. The feet are often affected after falling, such as incurring a broken ankle, foot, or toe, and it is always a good option to learn about fall prevention techniques. Research has indicated that approximately one-quarter of people who are 65 years and older fall every year. Additionally, the risk of falling increases with age, and the importance of practicing fall prevention methods becomes imperative. It is wise to have routine physical and eye examinations where existing medications and current eyeglass prescriptions are checked. At the same time, an examination can diagnose thyroid disorders, which may lead to increased falls. It is beneficial to incorporate gentle exercises and stretches into your daily routine, which can help to increase muscle strength. Installing grab bars in the shower and toilet area may help to reduce the risk of falling, in addition to using a bath mat while standing in and out of the shower. If you would like to learn about other effective fall prevention methods, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Preventing falls among the elderly is very important. If you are older and have fallen or fear that you are prone to falling, consult with one of our podiatrists from Foot Health Center of Merrimack Valley. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality advice and care.

Every 11 seconds, an elderly American is being treated in an emergency room for a fall related injury. Falls are the leading cause of head and hip injuries for those 65 and older. Due to decreases in strength, balance, senses, and lack of awareness, elderly persons are very susceptible to falling. Thankfully, there are a number of things older persons can do to prevent falls.

How to Prevent Falls

Some effective methods that older persons can do to prevent falls include:

  • Enrolling in strength and balance exercise program to increase balance and strength
  • Periodically having your sight and hearing checked
  • Discuss any medications you have with a doctor to see if it increases the risk of falling
  • Clearing the house of falling hazards and installing devices like grab bars and railings
  • Utilizing a walker or cane
  • Wearing shoes that provide good support and cushioning
  • Talking to family members about falling and increasing awareness

Falling can be a traumatic and embarrassing experience for elderly persons; this can make them less willing to leave the house, and less willing to talk to someone about their fears of falling. Doing such things, however, will increase the likelihood of tripping or losing one’s balance. Knowing the causes of falling and how to prevent them is the best way to mitigate the risk of serious injury.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in North Andover, and Tewksbury, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 15 November 2022 00:00

Damage that happens to the peripheral nervous system may be referred to as peripheral neuropathy. This can lead to peripheral artery disease, and the abbreviation for this is PAD. There are various groups of nerves that can be affected by this condition. These are the motor nerves and are used for walking and talking. When information is transmitted from the brain to the body that consists of temperature or slight pain, it falls into the sensory nerve category. Activities that happen naturally such as breathing, and digesting foods are part of the autonomic nerves. Damage can occur to these nerve groups as a result of diabetes, vascular problems, or autoimmune diseases. Additionally, kidney and liver disorders may contribute to developing PAD. Common symptoms can include the inability to feel sensations in the feet, and walking may become difficult. If you have diabetes and have a loss of feeling in your feet, it is strongly urged that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can effectively treat PAD.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with one of our podiatrists from Foot Health Center of Merrimack Valley. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in North Andover, and Tewksbury, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Sunday, 13 November 2022 00:00

Custom orthotics, or shoe inserts, should be periodically replaced. Orthotics must fit properly to give you the best results. Protect your feet and ankles!

Tuesday, 08 November 2022 00:00

Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. It involves the inflammation of the plantar fascia, which is a band of tissue that connects the toes to the heel along the sole of the foot. Most people with plantar fasciitis can be treated through a series of exercises, resting the foot, and wearing orthotics in the shoe. In rare cases, however, surgery is the only viable option for relief. Surgery should be considered only if the plantar fasciitis has not responded to ordinary treatment after at least six months to a year. In addition, if significant pain affects your job or daily activities, surgery may be an option. Further, if the pain caused by plantar fasciitis disrupts or inhibits the quality of your life, you may wish to explore surgical options. Plantar fascia release surgery cuts the plantar fascia to relieve tension. This can be done by cutting through the heel in open surgery or performing endoscopic surgery, which is less invasive but reduces access and view of the area. To find out more about the surgical options for relief from plantar fasciitis, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist. 

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact one of our podiatrists from Foot Health Center of Merrimack Valley. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in North Andover, and Tewksbury, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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