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North Andover (978) 686-7623
Tewksbury (978) 640-1010

July 2022

Tuesday, 26 July 2022 00:00

Should My Plantar Warts Feel Itchy?

There are a variety of skin conditions that affect the feet and can be quite threatening to the vitality of your feet. Plantar warts are one such condition. These warts can develop on the bottom of the feet when an individual is exposed to a form of human papillomavirus (HPV). This generally occurs from person-to-person contact or in warm, moist environments where HPV thrives. Plantar warts can be dangerous, potentially creating holes in the soles of the feet. Some individuals with plantar warts complain that the condition is quite itchy, and some report scratching at their plantar warts. Itchy plantar warts are not unusual. This is because the plantar wart is itself made up of dry skin that is flaking, which can be itchy. There are several things that you might be able to do at home to stop your plantar warts from itching. For example, you might be able to take an oatmeal bath to soothe the affected skin area. Additionally, you can try applying moisturizer to your plantar warts to get them to stop itching. The application of moisturizer can help replenish your feet with much-needed moisture, which can help the itching subside. Please see a podiatrist to learn more about how to treat your itchy plantar warts.

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact one of our podiatrists from Foot Health Center of Merrimack Valley. Our doctors will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in North Andover, and Tewksbury, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What Are Plantar Warts?

The medical term for the foot condition known as Morton’s neuroma is Morton’s metatarsalgia or interdigital neuroma. It is an ailment that affects the area between the third and fourth toes, and is quite painful. The pain is often felt in the ball of the foot and between the toes. It occurs as a result of a nerve that thickens between the toes, and can happen from wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in. High heels generally fit into this category. Additionally,  people who participate in high-impact physical activities that consist of running and jumping may be affected. Many patients with Morton's neuroma experience severe pain and find it difficult to walk. It may begin with a tingling or numbing sensation, and may gradually develop into a shooting pain. It can be likened to walking with a pebble or marble in the shoe. In mild cases, relief may come from implementing simple lifestyle changes, such as wearing comfortable shoes and refraining from running and jumping. Surgery that can reset the nerve may be an option in severe cases. If you have this type of foot pain, please consult with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose and treat Morton’s neuroma. 

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact one of our podiatrists of Foot Health Center of Merrimack Valley. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in North Andover, and Tewksbury, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Morton's Neuroma
Saturday, 16 July 2022 00:00

Gout Pain Can Be Managed

Gout is a painful, inflammatory form of arthritis. Those affected will typically feel an intense stiffness in the joints of their feet, particularly in the big toe. Schedule a visit to learn about how gout can be managed and treated.

Tuesday, 12 July 2022 00:00

Children and Broken Toes

A broken toe is uncomfortable for the majority of people, and can be discouraging for children who sustain this type of fracture. It is often necessary to refrain from putting pressure on the foot as the healing process occurs, and this may interfere with participating in physical activities. A broken toe can happen if a heavy object falls on it, or if it is jammed against a piece of furniture. Many children notice immediate symptoms that include bruising, swelling, and the inability to walk on the affected foot. Additionally, in severe breaks, the bone may protrude from the skin at an abnormal angle, causing severe pain and discomfort. If you think your child may have broken their toe, a proper diagnosis is necessary. This can consist of having an X-ray or MRI taken. For mild breaks, buddy taping can be an effective form of treatment. This is done by taping the broken toe to the toe next to it, providing the stability needed for complete healing. A broken toe can be treated by a podiatrist who can effectively diagnose and monitor this type of injury. 

Broken toes may cause a lot of pain and should be treated as soon as possible. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Foot Health Center of Merrimack Valley. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Is a Broken Toe?

A broken toe occurs when one or more of the toe bones of the foot are broken after an injury. Injuries such as stubbing your toe or dropping a heavy object on it may cause a toe fracture.

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Swelling
  • Pain (with/without wearing shoes)
  • Stiffness
  • Nail Injury

Although the injured toe should be monitored daily, it is especially important to have a podiatrist look at your toe if you have severe symptoms. Some of these symptoms include worsening or new pain that is not relieved with medication, sores, redness, or open wounds near the toe.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in North Andover, and Tewksbury, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe

The importance of knowing how to prevent running injuries is crucial for people who enjoy the sport of marathon running or light jogging. Research has indicated that approximately 50 percent of injuries can happen every year to people who run regularly. An injury to the Achilles tendon is a common running mishap, and this can cause severe pain and discomfort. It often happens as a result of increasing speed and intensity too quickly, which may rupture or inflame the Achilles tendon. An effective prevention technique is to warm up and cool down for several minutes, and gradually increase the force of the running. Many people develop and suffer from plantar fasciitis, causing severe heel pain. It can occur from not stretching the calf muscles before running, and prevention can be increased when range of motion is expanded in the overall foot. An ankle sprain occurs when the ligaments and tendons in the ankle become overstretched from rolling the ankle beyond its normal limitations. When the muscles are strengthened surrounding the ankle, the chance of incurring an ankle sprain may be decreased. If you would like more information about how running injuries affect the feet, and how to prevent them, please consult with a podiatrist.

All runners should take extra precaution when trying to avoid injury. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists of Foot Health Center of Merrimack Valley. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

There are a lot of mistakes a runner can make prior to a workout that can induce injury. A lot of athletes tend to overstretch before running, instead of saving those workouts for a post-run routine. Deep lunges and hand-to-toe hamstring pulls should be performed after a workout instead of during a warmup. Another common mistake is jumping into an intense routine before your body is physically prepared for it. You should try to ease your way into long-distance running instead of forcing yourself to rush into it.

More Tips for Preventing Injury

  • Incorporate Strength Training into Workouts - This will help improve the body’s overall athleticism
  • Improve and Maintain Your Flexibility – Stretching everyday will help improve overall performance
  • “Warm Up” Before Running and “Cool Down” Afterward – A warm up of 5-10 minutes helps get rid of lactic acid in the muscles and prevents delayed muscle soreness
  • Cross-Training is Crucial
  • Wear Proper Running Shoes
  • Have a Formal Gait Analysis – Poor biomechanics can easily cause injury

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in North Andover, and Tewksbury, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Preventing Running Injuries
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